Tuesday, 28 May 2024 00:00

Plantar fasciitis is a foot condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of the plantar fascia, a thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel to the toes. This condition often develops gradually over time, resulting from repetitive strain and stress on the plantar fascia. Activities that involve prolonged standing, walking, or running, especially on hard surfaces, can worsen the problem. Additionally, factors such as obesity, tight calf muscles, high arches, flat feet, and non-supportive footwear can increase the risk of developing plantar fasciitis. Symptoms include heel pain, particularly in the morning or after periods of inactivity, which can worsen with activity. While plantar fasciitis can be challenging to manage, various treatment options, including rest, stretching exercises, orthotic devices, and in severe cases, corticosteroid injections or surgery, can help alleviate pain and promote healing. If you have persistent heel pain, it is strongly suggested that you consult a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose and treat the cause.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Thomas Bobrowski, DPM  from InStride Crystal Coast Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in New Bern, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 21 May 2024 00:00

Poor circulation in the feet and lower legs can be caused by several common health issues that impact blood flow. One of these health issues is peripheral artery disease, or PAD, where arteries narrow due to plaque buildup. This reduces blood supply to the lower limbs and feet. Diabetes can also contribute to circulation problems because changing blood sugar levels damages blood vessels, reducing their ability to transport blood efficiently. Obesity can also contribute by putting strain on the circulatory system, and sedentary lifestyles further hinder blood flow. Smoking is another major risk factor for poor circulation in the feet, as it causes constriction and hardening of the arteries. Symptoms of poor circulation include cold feet, numbness, tingling, swelling, and in severe cases, pain and skin color changes. Regular check-ups with a podiatrist, or foot doctor, can help you manage and mitigate the effects of poor circulation. If you have any symptoms of poor circulation in the feet, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist for care. 

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Thomas Bobrowski, DPM of InStride Crystal Coast Podiatry. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in New Bern, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Tuesday, 14 May 2024 00:00

Your toes might seem like small, inconsequential parts of your body, but when they're happy and healthy, they play a big role in your overall comfort and mobility. Fortunately, you don't need fancy equipment or hours of time to keep your toes in tip-top shape. Just a few simple toe stretches can go a long way in promoting flexibility, strength, and comfort. Stretching your toes is about promoting blood flow, reducing pain and swelling, and minimizing your risk of injury. Start with both feet flat on the floor, then lift your toes, aiming to get them all to the same height. Hold for a few seconds, then repeat. Similar to the toe lift, but this time, try to spread your toes apart as much as possible while lifting. Stand next to a wall and use your hands for support as you press your toes against the wall, flexing them gently. Wrap a towel or belt around your big toe and gently pull it toward you to increase mobility. Using a wall for support, push the toes of one foot against the floor to stretch them. While these stretches can work wonders for many people, it's essential to listen to your body and consult with a podiatrist if you experience persistent pain or discomfort. They can offer personalized advice and treatment options to keep your feet happy and healthy for years to come. Incorporating these simple toe stretches into your daily routine takes just a few minutes but can make a world of difference in how your toes feel and function. If you are experiencing any type of toe pain, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Thomas Bobrowski, DPM from InStride Crystal Coast Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Being the backbone of the body, the feet carry your entire weight and can easily become overexerted, causing cramps and pain. As with any body part, stretching your feet can serve many benefits. From increasing flexibility to even providing some pain relief, be sure to give your feet a stretch from time to time. This is especially important for athletes or anyone performing aerobic exercises, but anyone experiencing foot pain or is on their feet constantly should also engage in this practice.

Great ways to stretch your feet:

  • Crossing one leg over the others and carefully pull your toes back. Do 10-20 repetitions and repeat the process for each foot
  • Face a wall with your arms out and hands flat against the wall. Step back with one foot and keep it flat on the floor while moving the other leg forward. Lean towards the wall until you feel a stretch. Hold for 30 seconds and perform 10 repetitions for each foot
  • Be sure not to overextend or push your limbs too hard or you could risk pulling or straining your muscle

Individuals who tend to their feet by regular stretching every day should be able to minimize foot pain and prevent new problems from arising.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in New Bern, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 07 May 2024 00:00

Athlete’s foot, medically known as tinea pedis, is a fungal skin infection that can affect anyone regardless of their athletic pursuits. This highly contagious fungus spreads easily from person to person, and thrives in moist environments such as pools, locker rooms, and public showers. The fungus responsible commonly affects the feet, causing redness, itching, and skin flakiness between the toes. Other symptoms of athlete's foot include burning or stinging sensations, blisters, and thick or discolored toenails. Symptoms may differ, depending on the type of athlete’s foot infection. Toe web infection typically results in skin peeling and cracking between the fourth and fifth toes. Moccasin type infection presents as thick, cracked skin on the bottom of the foot, often near the heel. It is sometimes accompanied by a foul odor. Vesicular type infection leads to blisters on the sole of the foot. If you suspect you have athlete’s foot, it is suggested that you seek prompt treatment from a podiatrist to limit the spread of infection.

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact Thomas Bobrowski, DPM from InStride Crystal Coast Podiatry.  Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in New Bern, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete's Foot

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